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GENERATION WATER

We’re entering a new era, one that will be defined by our relationship with water.

Do you have an idea to help Canada’s fresh water? WWF-Canada’s Generation Water Tech Challenge can help you bring that idea to life.

Submit your Solution by
November 15, 2019

© Oliver Woods / WWF-Canada

Watershed-Icon-Blue
WHY WATER?

Safeguarding Canada’s watersheds is among the greatest challenges of our time. Contemporary pressures including growing population, increasing demand for food and energy, urbanization and climate change are mounting and compounding. From flooding to droughts, climate impacts are felt through our water more than in any other way.

© Living Lakes Canada / WWF-Canada

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THE FACTS

What we know about Canada's water

Human activities are stressing Canada’s watersheds and a lack of comprehensive, open access water data means little to no knowledge of how those threats are impacting watershed health. This data and knowledge will become crucial for making decisions in a warming world.

In 2017, WWF-Canada completed the first-ever national assessment of Canada’s watersheds. We examined four indicators of health and seven indicators of threat to assign overall scores to each watershed. Where there was not enough data available, the watershed was considered data deficient.

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WATER HEALTH AT A GLANCE
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110/167

sub-watersheds are data deficient

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37

sub-watersheds received a less than good flow score

facts-water-quality

42

sub-watersheds have poor or fair water quality

facts-macro-invertebrates

112

sub-watersheds are data deficient for benthic macro-invertebrates

facts-habitat-loss

53/167

sub-watersheds have high or very high threats. Pollution, habitat fragmentation and habitat loss are the most common.

facts-climate-change

126

sub-watersheds are experiencing moderate or high threats from climate change

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See WWF-Canada's Watershed Reports for a complete status report on Canada's freshwater ecosystems.

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THE CHALLENGE

We are seeking bold and transformative solutions to help achieve our goal of ensuring all of Canada’s freshwater is healthy.

WWF-Canada’s 2017 Watershed Reports identified two priority problems for Canada’s fresh water: high threats to urban watersheds and missing data across the country. These priorities are represented in our two problem briefs. We want to move beyond good ideas to tangible solutions that will have meaningful impact for water. Our hope is that by using new technologies, or finding novel approaches for existing methods, we will discover previously unexplored paths towards healthy freshwater. We welcome varied technology-enabled solutions, using hardware and/or software to achieve conservation outcomes. Explore more about each of the problem briefs below.

© Staffan Widstrand / WWF

Brief 1

Urban communities and fresh water

How might we reduce the impacts of urban communities on our fresh water, allowing people and nature to thrive together?

© WWF-Canada / Noah Cole

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CHALLENGE BRIEF 1

Urban communities and fresh water

How might we reduce the impacts of urban communities on our fresh water, allowing people and nature to thrive together?

THE PROBLEM

With more than 80 percent of Canadians living in cities, there is substantial pressure on urban watersheds. Increasing urbanization leads to pollution, habitat loss and habitat fragmentation. Climate change pressures exacerbate an already stressed relationship.

© Frank Parhizgar / WWF-Canada

Some examples of these threats are:
Pollution

The Toronto and Region Conservation Authority found that water quality is directly correlated to urbanization. They found the largest drivers of poor water quality are non-point source pollutants (such as the nutrients, pesticides and chemicals used to treat homes, gardens and roads) making their way into rivers and lakes through lawns, sewer drains and direct runoff. Other drivers include point-source pollutants such as industry spills and discharge and sewer outflows.

© Graeme Stewart-Robertson

Climate Change and Habitat Loss

Recent major flooding events in cities like Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and along the St. John River in New Brunswick are linked to increasing threats and urbanization. Often cities are built in a way that destroys the natural floodplain buffers of large bodies of water, replacing habitats with impervious surfaces and causing water to run off or pool, rather than be absorbed. These poorly planned conditions increase the chances of flooding. As extreme precipitation events become more frequent, flooding events will also increase and become more severe.

© iStock / Christophe Ledent / WWF-Canada

Habitat Fragmentation

Habitat fragmentation can have a significant impact on species. For example, the Okanagan population of Chinook salmon, which historically was large enough to support regional First Nations food and trade needs, was assessed as Endangered by COSEWIC in 2017. A key driver of their decline is the habitat fragmentation caused by dam constructions along their migration route.

Do you have a technology enabled solution to reduce the impacts of urban communities on our fresh water, allowing people and nature to thrive together? Register for the Generation Water Tech Challenge now.

Brief 2

Missing Fresh Water Data

How might we revolutionize our approach to water data to empower decision making?

© Ghost Watershed Alliance Society

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CHALLENGE BRIEF 2

Missing fresh water data

How might we revolutionize our approach to water data to empower decision making?

THE PROBLEM

Canada’s lack of water data is a challenge when making key decisions for conserving and managing a valuable natural resource.

Our 2017 Watershed Reports identified that 110 of 167 watersheds did not have enough data available to assess their health. Where monitoring does happen, the data is often inaccessible due to it being proprietary or in an incorrect format for analysis and use.

This adds up to a system where decision makers do not have adequate information required to make informed choices. Without baseline and real-time data, we can’t ensure that our water is healthy now, or in the future.

We have started building on the results Watershed Reports started, including through the use of blockchain technology and cutting-edge monitoring technology such as eDNA, but more needs to be done.

Do you have a technology enabled solution to revolutionize our approach to water data to empower decision making? Register for the Generation Water Tech Challenge now.

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THE AWARD

The top five projects will each receive an award package designed to help them bring their idea to life. Awards available include:

SPOTS IN CLIMATE VENTURES: EARTH TECH
$
IN GRANTS
ACCESS TO THE
WWF-CANADA NETWORK

© Alamy / Ken Gillespie / WWF-Canada

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AWARDS

Up to five projects will each receive an award package designed to help them bring their idea to life.

A $15,000 Grant

Award Recipients of the Generation Water Tech Challenge will each receive a $15,000 grant to put towards taking their freshwater solution to the next level. They will also be featured on the WWF-Canada Living Planet Technology Hub and other WWF-Canada channels.

A spot in Climate Ventures: Earth Tech

To help bring their solutions to life, Award Recipients will also receive a spot for 1-2 individuals from their team in the Earth Tech accelerator run by the Centre for Social Innovation’s (CSI) Climate Ventures, an incubator for climate entrepreneurs, innovators and leaders. Earth Tech runs from January to July 2020 and culminates in a Demo Night where participants will pitch to investors, funders and potential partners. If necessary, Award Recipients will also receive travel bursaries to attend the final Demo Night.

ABOUT CLIMATE VENTURES

The six-month accelerator places the emphasis on developing the technology’s readiness and the financial viability of the enterprise or non-profit initiative, with a focus on rapidly progressing through the Technology Readiness Levels and on customer/beneficiary and capital/funding acquisition.

Supports provided include:

  • Entrepreneurs in Residence: Bi-weekly one-one time with Entrepreneurs in Residence (EIR), highly qualified and accomplished entrepreneurs that work with the ventures as coaches.
  • Advisors: Office hours with dozens of expert advisors to help guide and connect the enterprises, including from corporate partners and WWF-Canada.
  • Workspace: Workspace at CSI’s Climate Ventures incubator in downtown Toronto. If possible, CSI will leverage their network to find workspace in partner organizations for those Award Recipients outside of Toronto.
  • Workshops: Just-in-time learning provided through workshops in such areas as sales, investment readiness, law, impact measurement, and others.
  • Mastermind Groups: Peer groups facilitated by the EIRs for peer-peer support.
  • Demo Night: Support preparing pitches and pitch decks culminating in Demo Night where enterprises will pitch to investors, funders and potential partners.
  • Connections: Tapping into the CSI’s network of networks to connect to other programs, funding opportunities, pilot partners, and people. All enterprises will become members of the Centre for Social Innovation for instant connection to its 2,500+ members.
  • Office Hours: Every participant will have office hours for further coaching and support with the Program Director and Manager throughout the accelerator.
  • Impact Measurement: Training and coaching on impact measurement.
  • Increased Profile: Elevating your profile through marketing, storytelling, media relations, and events.

Climate Ventures helps entrepreneurs and innovators turn their ideas into impact. Earth Tech is specifically designed to amplify the impact and accelerate the success of those working on freshwater and climate solutions.

While CSI is based in Toronto, this program is open to Award Recipients from all across the country. Coaching, mentorship, and workshops will be available via video conference as required.

Participation in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech accelerator is required to be considered an Award Recipient of the Generation Water Tech Challenge. Where possible, some French services will be provided, however the ability to work in English is required.

Access to the WWF-Canada network

WWF-Canada is committed to helping the Award Recipients of the Generation Water Tech Challenge achieve impact with their technology. We know that often technologies need pilot or demonstration sites, and those can be difficult to find. Our Award Recipients won’t be alone! Where possible, WWF-Canada will leverage our networks to open doors for our Award Recipients and help and facilitate pilot and demonstration sites for their technologies.

© Paul Vecsei / Engbretson Underwater Photography / WWF-Canada

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ELIGIBILITY

Anyone may take part in the Generation Water challenge if they meet the following criteria and terms.

  • Must be available to participate in Climate Ventures: Earth Tech from January – July 2020
  • Must reside in Canada and the project must be based in Canada
  • Must be at least 18 years of age
  • Projects should be in the discovery to validation phase. (Ideation stage projects may be considered if the proponent can demonstrate commitment to the venture)
  • Open to organizations/individuals including unincorporated persons, registered non-profits, registered charities, cooperative - non-profits, for-profit entities, public sector, collaboratives (project of more than one organization with the same legal form), multi-sectoral (project of more than one organization with different legal forms), or sole proprietors

© iStock / wildnerdpix / WWF-Canada

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GENERATION WATER CHALLENGE

Frequently Asked Questions

ABOUT
1. What are the goals of the WWF-Canada Generation Water Tech Challenge?

WWF-Canada is seeking bold, innovative and transformative ideas to help achieve our vision of seeing all of Canada’s fresh water in good condition. Our Watershed Reports identified two priority problems for Canada’s fresh water: high threats to urban watersheds and missing data across the country. It’s time to move beyond good ideas to tangible solutions that will have meaningful impact for water.

We are looking for technology-enabled solutions using hardware and/or software to achieve conservation outcomes around 2 problem briefs (solutions can address one or both problem briefs):

  1. How might we reduce the impacts of urban communities on our fresh water, allowing people and nature to thrive together?
  2. How might we revolutionize our approach to water data to empower decision making?

By providing support through our awards to the winners of the Challenge, our goal is that eventually these technologies will be used at scale to see improvements in the scores of our Watershed Reports.

2. How will my submission be evaluated?

Our review committee involves experts from the conservation and innovation communities. After an initial eligibility screening, proposals will be evaluated based on:

  • Alignment with WWF-Canada’s goals
  • Ecological and social responsibility
  • Impact on freshwater health and or data
  • Scalability of the solution
  • Feasibility of implementing the solution
  • Innovative and novel technology or approach
  • Openness and accessibility of the solution, including sharing knowledge and key learnings
3. Is the Generation Water Tech Challenge available in French?

Unfortunately, the Challenge is not completely bilingual. Where possible, the content is available in French, however the User Profile registration process and online Submission Form are only available in English. If you would prefer to make your submission in French, please contact us and we will provide a French Submission Form. If you are selected as a Finalist, the presentation to the Expert Committee must be done in English.

Furthermore, the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program is conducted in English. Some French services may be provided to our Award Recipients during the course of the program, but the ability to speak and write in English is required for participation. Our hope is that future WWF-Canada Challenges will be bilingual.

4. Can I talk to someone at WWF-Canada to learn more about the Watershed Reports of about the Generation Water Tech Challenge?

Sure! If you have any questions, send us a message and we’ll get in touch.

APPLYING
5. Can I submit more than one idea?

Individuals can only enter one Submission, however, you can be listed as a team member on multiple Submissions. Keep in mind that Award Recipients will need to be available to participate in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program, so it is unlikely that two ideas from the same person will be selected as Award Recipients.

6. Does my solution need to address both problem briefs?

No. Your solution only needs to address one problem brief, although if it touches on both, great!

7. Innovative vs. invention?

When we talk about innovation, we don’t necessarily mean that you’ve invented something new. There are many opportunities to use existing technologies in new and innovative ways. To be eligible for this Challenge, you do not need to have created a completely new product (although if you have, that’s pretty cool too!) We will also be considering those submissions which find a novel approach to using existing technologies to solve freshwater issues.

8. What does "discovery to validation" mean?

There are several stages involved in taking a good idea and bringing it up to scale. They can be categorized as:

  • Ideation: An entrepreneur has an idea. This phase includes initial market and technology exploration.
  • Discovery: In this phase the value proposition of the venture is established, ideas are tested, a proof of concept is achieved, and customers are identified. This phase also involves early financials
  • Validation: During this phase, a business model established, there is a minimum viable product, and customers are verified. There may be some initial orders and the testing of a go-to-market strategy.
  • Efficiency: This phase starts to see initial market traction. Forecasts begin being based on actuals. There is a transition to scaling sale and marketing and demand creation.
  • Scale: In the final phase, there is a validated product and market, customer growth and an established management team

For our challenge, we are prioritizing solutions in the discovery to validation phases. We will also accept those in the ideation phase, however, we will be looking for a demonstrated commitment to the project from the project lead and/or team.

AWARDS
9. If I'm selected as an Award Recipient, do I have to participate in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program? Can I just have the grant?

The goal of this program is to see the technologies identified through the Generation Water Tech Challenge used at scale to see improvements in the scores of our Watershed Reports. Therefore, participation in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program by 1-2 people per application is mandatory to receive the award funding. Applicants must be available to participate from January to July 2020.

10. I don't live in Toronto; how can I participate in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program?

We want applicants and award recipients from all over Canada! So, this being a tech challenge, we’ll use technology! Mentorship and coaching sessions will happen via video conferencing software. Where possible, CSI will leverage their network to find co-working space for winning teams outside of Toronto. Travel costs to participate in the in-person Demo night will be covered for 1-2 participants per winning team.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
11. Do I maintain ownership of my Intellectual Property?

Yes, all participants retain ownership of all rights, including intellectual property rights for project submitted to the Generation Energy Challenge. Keep in mind, as intention of this challenge is to create real-world solutions to Canada’s water issues, the open-source and accessible nature of the solution will be considered when evaluating proposals.

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HOW IT WORKS
  • Sep 16, 2019

    Challenge Launch

    September 18, 2019

    The Generation Water Tech Challenge
    launches and registration opens. 

    Register for an account to get access to the submission form.

  • Sep 16, 2019

    Application period closes

    November 15, 2019

    Last day to make submissions to the
    Generation Water Tech Challenge.
    Submissions will be accepted until 11:59 PST.

  • Sep 11, 2019

    Initial Review

    November 15 - November 29, 2019

    Applications will be reviewed. Review Committee members may reach out to applicants for additional information. Finalists will be notified and invited to present to the Expert Review committee by November 29th.

  • Sep 11, 2019

    Presentation Week

    December 9 – 13, 2019

    Finalists will make a 5-minute presentation via video conference to the Expert Review Committee followed by a short Q&A.

  • Sep 11, 2019

    Final notification

    December 13, 2019

    Finalists will be notified of the results.

  • Sep 11, 2019

    CSI Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program

    January - July 2020

    Award recipients will participate in the CSI Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program with ongoing support from WWF-Canada.

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MEET THE EXPERT JUDGES
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Elizabeth Hendriks

Vice-President, Freshwater, WWF-Canada

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ON THE JUDGING PANEL

Elizabeth Hendriks

Vice-President, Freshwater, WWF-Canada

Elizabeth has fifteen years of experience working nationally and internationally on water policy. In her capacity as Vice President of WWF-Canada’s freshwater program, she led the 2017 release of Watershed Reports - the first national assessment of the health and stressors of Canada’s freshwater.

Building on the results of Watershed Reports, she is leading the Freshwater team in efforts to reverse the decline of freshwater ecosystems across the country with the intersection of technology, policy, and community building. Recently, this cutting-edge approach has included pairing community-based monitoring with the security of blockchain technology to better understand water health, and empowering citizen scientists to monitor their rivers using eDNA.

Elizabeth received her BA in International Development from Dalhousie University and her Master’s in Environmental Studies from the University of Waterloo.

Headshot of Andrew Craig

Andrew Craig

Senior Director, Sustainability, RBC

Headshot of Andrew Craig
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ON THE JUDGING PANEL

Andrew Craig MBA, MSc.

Senior Director, Sustainability, RBC

Andrew leads the RBC Sustainability Group with responsibility for developing and executing RBC’s corporate sustainability strategies, more recently this work has focused on developing RBC’s enterprise approach to climate change. The Sustainability Group is the Centre of Expertise for the integration of environmental sustainability into RBC’s business and functional units, ESG reporting and disclosures, and RBC’s strategic approach to impact measurement. The Group also has an important role in protecting and enhancing RBC’s brand through external engagement with key stakeholders such as investors, government, clients and NGOs on a range of environmental and social topics.

Before joining RBC, Andrew worked as a consultant for Deloitte in the Environment and Sustainability practice helping clients develop sustainability strategies and project managed GHG emission inventory audits. He also worked as an Air Quality Scientist for Jacques Whitford Environment (now Stantec) preparing air emission inventories for industrial clients, conducting ambient air quality monitoring programs and preparing regulatory submissions to the Ministry of the Environment. Andrew holds a BSc. from the University of Guelph in Natural Resources Management, an MSc. in Environmental Technologies from Imperial College in London, UK and has a Masters in Business Administration from the Schulich School of Business in Toronto.

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Winnie Lam

Director of Energy, Google Cloud

Headshot of Winnie Lam
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ON THE JUDGING PANEL

Winnie Lam

Director of Energy, Google Cloud

Winnie is responsible for strategy, product offerings and strategic relationships with customers in the Energy industry. She helps companies transform their businesses through big data analytics, artificial intelligence and cloud computing.

Since joining Google in 2004, Winnie held leadership positions in Engineering, Product Management, Data Centers and Environmental Sustainability. Prior to her current role, she led Google data centers’ initiatives on energy efficiency, emergency power generation, water conservation, and waste management. She received several Google Executive Management and Founder’s Awards for her achievements.

Outside of Google, Winnie serves on the National Council at the World Wildlife Fund. Together with WWF, she co-founded the Coalition to End Wildlife Trafficking Online, uniting Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and many other tech companies to ban online sales of elephant ivory and endangered animal products.

Winnie received her B.Sc. in Systems Design Engineering from the University of Waterloo in Canada. Her M.Sc. in Energy Policy and Climate from Johns Hopkins University is in progress.

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Daniel Novielli

Ontario Sales Manager - Internet of Things, TELUS

Headshot of Daniel
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ON THE JUDGING PANEL

Daniel Novielli

Ontario Sales Manager - Internet of Things, TELUS

For over 11 years, Dan Novielli has built his career on connecting organizations to the people and things that matter most.

The Internet of Things (IoT) consists of all the web-enabled devices that collect, send and act on data they acquire from their surrounding environments using embedded sensors, processors and communication hardware.

As an Internet of Things Leader at TELUS, Dan has helped guide many organizations use IoT as a vehicle to positively impact profitability, productivity, their customer experience and with their compliance to local laws and regulations.

Outside of work, Dan enjoys spending time with his wife and two young boys (7 and 4).

He is also an active member with his church and volunteers time to support several of their youth programs.

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Jean-François Barsoum

Senior Managing Consultant, Smarter Cities, Water and Transportation, Innovation, Research & Development, IBM

Headshot of Jean Francois
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ON THE JUDGING PANEL

Jean-François Barsoum

Senior Managing Consultant, Smarter Cities, Water and Transportation, Innovation, Research & Development, IBM

Jean-François Barsoum has over 20 years of experience at IBM where his focus is on understanding and communicating the societal and environmental impacts of technology. He was part of the core team that built the smart city concepts in the early 2000s.

Currently, his main objective is to communicate and popularise climate change solutions, smart city innovations, and the potential impacts of autonomous vehicles.

In 2008, he was selected by Al Gore's Climate Project to be trained by the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. He later joined the board of directors of the Canadian branch of Mr. Gore's Foundation for Climate change education.

He regularly advises startups in incubators and accelerators, and is collaborating on large research collaborations with several Canadian universities.

He chairs the disruptive technology committee of the Montreal Chamber of Commerce, as well as the Quebec Smart Transportation experts’ committee; is a director at the Canadian Water Network, and has advised the Canadian government on cleantech programs. He is also part of the committee overseeing the application of the Quebec Policy on Sustainable Mobility.

Read answers to frequently asked questions

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Get in touch to ask
a question

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FAQ

© iStock / wildnerdpix / WWF-Canada

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GENERATION WATER CHALLENGE

Frequently Asked Questions

ABOUT
1. What are the goals of the WWF-Canada Generation Water Tech Challenge?

WWF-Canada is seeking bold, innovative and transformative ideas to help achieve our vision of seeing all of Canada’s fresh water in good condition. Our Watershed Reports identified two priority problems for Canada’s fresh water: high threats to urban watersheds and missing data across the country. It’s time to move beyond good ideas to tangible solutions that will have meaningful impact for water.

We are looking for technology-enabled solutions using hardware and/or software to achieve conservation outcomes around 2 problem briefs (solutions can address one or both problem briefs):

  1. How might we reduce the impacts of urban communities on our fresh water, allowing people and nature to thrive together?
  2. How might we revolutionize our approach to water data to empower decision making?

By providing support through our awards to the winners of the Challenge, our goal is that eventually these technologies will be used at scale to see improvements in the scores of our Watershed Reports.

2. How will my submission be evaluated?

Our review committee involves experts from the conservation and innovation communities. After an initial eligibility screening, proposals will be evaluated based on:

  • Alignment with WWF-Canada’s goals
  • Ecological and social responsibility
  • Impact on freshwater health and or data
  • Scalability of the solution
  • Feasibility of implementing the solution
  • Innovative and novel technology or approach
  • Openness and accessibility of the solution, including sharing knowledge and key learnings
3. Is the Generation Water Tech Challenge available in French?

Unfortunately, the Challenge is not completely bilingual. Where possible, the content is available in French, however the User Profile registration process and online Submission Form are only available in English. If you would prefer to make your submission in French, please contact us and we will provide a French Submission Form. If you are selected as a Finalist, the presentation to the Expert Committee must be done in English.

Furthermore, the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program is conducted in English. Some French services may be provided to our Award Recipients during the course of the program, but the ability to speak and write in English is required for participation. Our hope is that future WWF-Canada Challenges will be bilingual.

4. Can I talk to someone at WWF-Canada to learn more about the Watershed Reports of about the Generation Water Tech Challenge?

Sure! If you have any questions, send us a message and we’ll get in touch.

APPLYING
5. Can I submit more than one idea?

Individuals can only enter one Submission, however, you can be listed as a team member on multiple Submissions. Keep in mind that Award Recipients will need to be available to participate in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program, so it is unlikely that two ideas from the same person will be selected as Award Recipients.

6. Does my solution need to address both problem briefs?

No. Your solution only needs to address one problem brief, although if it touches on both, great!

7. Innovative vs. invention?

When we talk about innovation, we don’t necessarily mean that you’ve invented something new. There are many opportunities to use existing technologies in new and innovative ways. To be eligible for this Challenge, you do not need to have created a completely new product (although if you have, that’s pretty cool too!) We will also be considering those submissions which find a novel approach to using existing technologies to solve freshwater issues.

8. What does "discovery to validation" mean?

There are several stages involved in taking a good idea and bringing it up to scale. They can be categorized as:

  • Ideation: An entrepreneur has an idea. This phase includes initial market and technology exploration.
  • Discovery: In this phase the value proposition of the venture is established, ideas are tested, a proof of concept is achieved, and customers are identified. This phase also involves early financials
  • Validation: During this phase, a business model established, there is a minimum viable product, and customers are verified. There may be some initial orders and the testing of a go-to-market strategy.
  • Efficiency: This phase starts to see initial market traction. Forecasts begin being based on actuals. There is a transition to scaling sale and marketing and demand creation.
  • Scale: In the final phase, there is a validated product and market, customer growth and an established management team

For our challenge, we are prioritizing solutions in the discovery to validation phases. We will also accept those in the ideation phase, however, we will be looking for a demonstrated commitment to the project from the project lead and/or team.

AWARDS
9. If I'm selected as an Award Recipient, do I have to participate in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program? Can I just have the grant?

The goal of this program is to see the technologies identified through the Generation Water Tech Challenge used at scale to see improvements in the scores of our Watershed Reports. Therefore, participation in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program by 1-2 people per application is mandatory to receive the award funding. Applicants must be available to participate from January to July 2020.

10. I don't live in Toronto; how can I participate in the Climate Ventures: Earth Tech program?

We want applicants and award recipients from all over Canada! So, this being a tech challenge, we’ll use technology! Mentorship and coaching sessions will happen via video conferencing software. Where possible, CSI will leverage their network to find co-working space for winning teams outside of Toronto. Travel costs to participate in the in-person Demo night will be covered for 1-2 participants per winning team.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
11. Do I maintain ownership of my Intellectual Property?

Yes, all participants retain ownership of all rights, including intellectual property rights for project submitted to the Generation Energy Challenge. Keep in mind, as intention of this challenge is to create real-world solutions to Canada’s water issues, the open-source and accessible nature of the solution will be considered when evaluating proposals.

SUBMIT YOUR SOLUTION

Submit your solution to the Generation Water challenge by November 15, 2019 and become part of the conservation tech movement.

© naturepl.com / Mike Potts / WWF

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